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Dr. Shazia Rashid, Ph.D

20210929_002459Dr. Shazia Rashid, Ph.D

Scientific Editor:

Dr. Shazia Rashid is currently working as Assistant Professor at Amity Institute of Biotechnology and Adjunct faculty at Amity Institute of Molecular Medicine and Stem Cells (AIMMSCR), Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida.

She has completed her B.Sc. (Honors) from Ch. Charan Singh University, Meerat and M.Sc. in Biotechnology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India. She was awarded prestigious Vice Chancellors Research Studentship to pursue Ph.D degree in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Ulster, United Kingdom (U.K.). After completing Ph.D in 2009, she worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Ulster and later at the University of Oxford.

Dr. Rashid joined Amity University, Noida in 2012 and has been involved in teaching, research and academic activities of the department. She teaches subjects like Cell Biology, Cancer Biology, Precision Medicine, Animal Biotechnology, Bioanalytical Instrumentation and Instrumentation in Biomedicine. Her area of research is Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery with an emphasis on HPV infection and cervical cancer.

She has received several awards and scholarships which include fully funded International Travel grant by ICGEB and University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, Postdoctoral grant by Cancer Research UK (CRUK), Postdoctoral grant by Invest Northern Ireland (InvestNI) and Ph.D fellowship grant Vice Chancellor’s Research Studentship (VCRS) by University of Ulster. She has also received Gold Medal in Academic Excellence in MSc. Biotechnology. She has published multiple research articles in well-known high impact factor journals such as Seminars in cancer Biology, PLoS One, Current Psychology etc. She has published an edited book with international publisher and has number of book chapters to her credit.

Dr. Rashid believes in mentoring and nurturing students. She is also associated with outreach activities and has conducted several workshops on awareness of HPV infection and cervical cancer among women.

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